3 Design Trend Stories for 2017 – The SOcolor Booklet

This Color Book gives you 3 of 2017’s key design trend stories: Desert Wanderer, Organic Matter and Analogue Workshop. The book includes a brief explanation of each of the trends, the Scarlet Opus Trend Boards illustrating each trend’s interior style and also the Pantone referenced color palettes for each trend story.

This book will give you guidance for the design and marketing of your product in line with future trends. It is an inspirational document that outlines key themes and important color palettes for interiors moving forward into 2017. Inspiring guidance for everything interiors including retail merchandising, product sourcing, stationery, furniture, decor, tabletop, kitchen design, and much more.

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New Designers 2016 – Part 1 – a most important Creative Showcase

This week New Designers took place at London’s Business Design Centre now in its 31st edition. The UK’s most important exhibition for emerging design is split into two parts. Part 1 focuses on textiles, jewellery, ceramics and glass and contemporary crafts. Part 2 is slanted towards product and industrial design, graphics, illustration and animation.

Designers who have completed their undergraduate and postgraduate degrees exhibit their work representing their university. A breadth of specialisms and talents are on display exhibiting high levels of originality, innovation and craftsmanship. Here is a round up of our favourite pieces as well as some of the trends which caught my eye.

First is Bath Spa graduate and Texprint 2016 finalist Lydia Knight. Inspired by botanicals, plants and flora she creates beautiful prints developed from exquisite hand drawn illustrations and paintings. I was attracted to her artworks which have then been developed in repeat using digital print techniques. Her designs could easily be adapted in the commercial interior and home furnishings sector; specifically wallpaper or the bedlinen market.

Lydia Knight Lydia Knight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fellow Bath Spa graduate is Rhian Beynon whose stunning paintings have been developed digitally. What I liked most about her collection, was her preference to display both the digital fabrics and a large scale painting (right) which would look beautiful as a bespoke artwork. The details and colours have been translated wonderfully into her repeated designs, again highly suitable for the commercial interiors sector.

Rhian Beynon Rhin Beynon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of the themes I noticed at the exhibition was ‘pleating’. This covered various disciplines including weave, knit and print. Catherine Kinsbury-Smith of Herriot Watt University uses iridescent yarns within the knitted fabrics.

Catherine Kingsbury-Smith

As the light shines depending on the time of day, the 3D illusion is emphasised. Likewise Glasgow School of Art graduate Rochelle McGuiness; the sharp lines and iridescent surfaces of her collection entitled ‘Distorting Perception of Depth’ allows the pieces to take on the colour of their surroundings and vary depending on the viewers standpoint. I particularly like the projection of her designs when used for lighting.

Rochelle McGuiness

‘Folded Nature’ by Loughborough Textile Innovation & Design graduate Lauren Saunders explores a three-dimensional, structured aesthetic for fashion. Taking inspiration from natural forms she combines a variety of fabric manipulation methods including ‘heat forming’. Enabling the fabrics to not only demonstrate functionality as they become flexible in response to the body, but also remain visually appealing. Although intended for the high end/haute couture fashion market, her designs could also be considered in other contexts such as an architectural installation.

Lauren SaundersL. Saunders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continuing with the theme of optical illusion, a number of new designers exhibiting represented this trend in the form of printed textiles. I’ve selected the work of graduate Stefan Volder for simple yet very effect designs. His menswear collection entitled ‘Concrete Nostalgia’ took inspiration from post-war modernist architecture in Scotland.

Stefan Vold copy stefan volder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anna Helgesson‘s work, from first time exhibitors Swedish School of Textiles the University of Boras (winners of the award for Best Stand); particularly stood out to me for its simple and striking primary coloured designs providing a clever optical illusion. It reminded me of the work by Japanese design studio A.P.Works. I really enjoyed all the Swedish School of Textiles’ graduates use of scale including the collection (UN)PERFECT – ‘Breaking the rules in textile printing’ by Lisa Fredin (left). These particular pieces I think would work well as drapes for windows or room divides as light can still be passed through whilst offering privacy.

Anna Helgesson

Lisa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Talking of large scale work, to be admired is the work of Katherine Plumb. The printer from Central St Martins takes inspiration from purpose built landscapes which are then developed into cut-paper collages and large scale prints destined for interiors. The quirky pegs used to display the fabrics are also playful and really suit the fun and bold colour palette.

katherine plumb csm

One Year On is a feature of the show that presents selected designers in their first year of business. Chosen by an independent panel they are selected based on their flair and quality of product. All work exhibited can be bought or commissioned directly from the designers at the show. Favourites of included Aimee Bollu, a member of the Crafts Council’s Hot House programme, Aimee seeks out objects that have fallen out of use and aims to bring them back to life. Combining found objects which may be viewed as conventional and mundane she adds newly created simple vessel forms offering the viewer something familiar yet fresh. With a subtle and contemporary palette, splashes of bright, the vessels can be viewed as a collection or as individual objects.

aimee aimee bolu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Well that’s it for the Part One report, I had a great time and highly recommend the exhibition as a great day out, a wonderful way in which to discover new talent and of course, a great place to buy some exquisite and unique pieces.

Let us know what your opinion is about what you’ve just seen and if we’ve persuaded you to go next year………

 

 

 

 

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Clerkenwell Design Week 2015 Highlights

Last week I spent some time visiting Clerkenwell Design Week in London. This is a design festival where all creative business showrooms open their doors; with exhibitions and pop up events taking place throughout the area. The atmosphere is always buzzing with world wide creatives celebrating design. I have put together some of my ‘best bits’ for those of you who didn’t get chance to visit this year. From the Design Factory in the Farmiloe Building, Platform, Detail and Additions exhibitions.

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1. Not Another Bill “The Gift that keeps on giving” – Not-Another-Bill aims to make your letter box a more magical place by introducing you to exclusive items from artists, designers and brands through a subscription each month. I love this concept and all of the unique gifts available, what a great way to collect ‘surprise’ designer products!

2. The Urban Botanist –  A stylish and contemporary way of displaying plants in your home living environment. This design concept allows you see house plants in a different way. Designer plants for the inspired city dweller wanting to enhance all aspects of living.

3. Helena Ambrósio – The pleated #02 series of the Porcelain Vase caught my eye. The beautiful petrol grey colour is subtle, modern and has a real fresh, contemporary feel.

4. Trend presentation by Sally Angharad sponsored by Tarkett – Our very own Sally presented Scarlet Opus Trends for 2016 and beyond at the Desso Studio. She explained what the driving forces are behind key colours, materials and interior styles.

5. Dome Studio –  I loved the playful colour contrast with geometric backdrop presented by Dome Studio. The A clock is a delicate form which takes inspiration from nature where the divisions serve a functional purpose whilst also highlighting the changing light conditions found throughout the day.

6. IIII – Unusual sculpured handmade chandeliers by Sarah Dehandschutter display a natural elegance that have a unique soft and streamlined character

7. Mutina tiles designed by Patricia Urquiola  ‘Tierras‘ at Domus – The new collection of geometric colour contrast tiles have a dual personality, combining the newest technological innovation with the concept of traditional, handmade productions. The warm earthy colour palette, with contemporary bright accents compliment as well as create striking contrast to suit individual styles.

8. Aleksandrina Rizova and Victoria Umansky – This collaboration of designers combine architecture with textiles. They create high quality products with an emphasis on surface texture, unusual design and luxurious materials.

This design festival gets better each year, we are already looking forward to 2016!

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Trendbook Offer: Visually Stunning 2015 Design Trends – Interiors

2015 Design Trendbook for Everything Interiors  

For a special price of just £60 you can get all the inspiration you’ll need to support your creativity this year. Purchase our 2015 Design Trends report.

This 75 page document includes 4 different design trends applicable to anything ‘interiors’ and outlines our background research including fashion and architecture, as well as a guide to material, shape, pattern, texture, and surface effects. Each trend includes a colour palette with Pantone Fashion + Home and Formula Guide Coated/Uncoated references. A perfect source of inspiration for product designers, marketing teams, interior designers, retailers for merchandising and window dressing – absolutely perfect. See the wealth of visually stunning inspiration below:

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Materials shapefashion colourpattern

BUY IT NOW – feel supported, inspired, renewed and have your own ideas confirmed

Got a question? phil@scarletopus.com call phil / Victoria or Laura +44 (0)1482 870360

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Craft Industrialism; Stories behind Products

Craft Industrialism is a new initiative that aims to bridge the gap between the craft maker and the public allowing us to understand and appreciate the process of craft practice. The event showcases a carefully curated exhibition presenting a selection of makers work, each project has a detailed narrative which illustrates the complexity and precision of the ideas from initial concepts, design and development, and finally to the chosen production method. This project also aims to demonstrate the importance of promoting and supporting our local creative businesses.

preview night

I went along to the preview evening of the event, there was a real buzz in the atmosphere, everyone seemed excited to learn and understand more about the meticulous presentation of each project. For me, it was interesting to visually see the full thought process of the maker, from project notes, to concept ideas and sketches. It was fascinating to see the tools that are used by the makers, this allows us to comprehend the intricate hand craft techniques and the amount of time and work that goes into the creation of the project.

craft

Since the contemporary craft movement we romanticise more of the handmade because we desire quality, not quantity. With the ‘handmade ethos’ becoming a key driver of consumer aspirations it becomes even more important for us to show a deeper understanding and appreciation of the design elements involved. From the sourcing of materials to the craft techniques through to the maker process, we have moved into a world where we value craft once again,  where we want individuality and unique quality, and are happy paying more money for one-off products. In today’s society we want to own less items and look towards owning products we feel mean something or have a story to tell.

Here is a look at some of my favourite designer-makers that are showcasing their work at this event, each maker will present their work over the next few days and discuss the theory or concept behind their designs. Tickets for these talks are available to buy and the exhibition is open to the public until Wednesday 25th March.

Ruth Pullan Textiles and Leather Work

Ruth’s studio is centered around exploring ways of manipulating leather into different forms and shapes. She utilises classic moulding techniques and shaping more often seen on a cutting table than in the workshop in order to bring together a new collection of work that challenges leather-working techniques with a modern twist.

Ruth Pullan

Laura Daza

Colour Factory is a visual and tactile investigation into the colour and dye world, using natural materials to question the relationship between nature and humans. The design is driven by the traditions of colour; celebrating ancient rituals or alchemic techniques and exploring ways for extracting natural pigments. Colours in nature are infinite, only a few thousand have been described and many others to be discovered.

Laura Daza

Convivial Project

Generative Scarves is a project that enables you to generate your own pattern for a scarf. For this project a procedural algorithm commonly used to digitally generate patterns of the natural world was sampled in a bespoke application. The Generative Scarves app, with its set of modifiable parameters enables the user to customise colours and patterns and create a unique print for a personalised scarf.

Convivial Project

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Craft Industrialism really makes you question what we buy and drives a desire to understand more about the story behind a certain product. This could be the story of the trend it aspires to create or the story of it’s history.  For retailers and manufacturers this concept is a great way to market product, allow conscientious consumers to understand the process, design and development that leads to the end creation. There is a growing interest in ‘real’ products and knowing everything about where it initiated so don’t just sell the product; tell it’s story to your consumers.

For more information on how you can achieve this contact us today.

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